Coaching

Welcome to Coach's Corner!

CONCENTRATION produces CONSISTENCY

Self evaluation, identify the weakness in your game and the shots you need to practice.

See you on the greens

The Coach

 

Our Coach Bob Bandy will assist players, both old and new (to the game!) to improve their skills and increase enjoyment of the game of bowls. We have included Bob's three week plan on the web site.

Week One

•START WITH ROLLING 4 JACKS (for 4 ends)

•SET JACK AT 30 METRES ON 2 RINKS

   DRAW 2 BOWLS ON YOUR FORHAND

   DRAW 2 BOWLS ON YOUR BACK HAND

 

(5 Ends each way)

Check grip, have good balance

Feet on mat pointing along aim line.

Keep your eyes on the target.

 

Week Two

•START WITH WARM UP      

ONE RINK SET UP 2 JACK’S

•ONE FULL LENGTH

•THE SECOND TWO METRES SHORT OF FULL LENGTH

• BOWL 1 ON THE FOREHAND AND 1 ON THE BACKHAND TO THE LONGEST JACK

•THEN REPEAT 1 ON THE FOREHAND AND 1 ON THE BACKHAND TO THE SHORTEST JACK

SECOND RINK SET UP JACK ON THE T AND PRACTICE YARD ON FROM FULL, MEDIUM AND SHORT LENGTH. (DON’T LOSE YOUR BOWL IN THE DITCH)

•DO SIX ENDS OF EACH EXERCISE

•COOL DOWN AND STRECH

 

Week Three

•START WITH WARM UP AND STRETCH

•Check grip, have good balance

•Feet on mat pointing along aim line.

•Keep your eyes on the target along aim line.

•Roll to a medium jack keeping your bowl on the draw side of the centre line both fore hand and backhand. (5 ends each way)

•COOL DOWN AND STRETCH

 

Roles of Positions

The Lead

PLAYING YOUR PART
AS THE LEAD

Presented by Macka Jensen

 

The purpose of this subject is to introduce the lead to those integral subjects in lawn bowls that may not have been covered in earlier coaching lessons. It is by no means complete but it will at least give a good base to understanding the basic fundamentals of playing your part in the team.


Official Duties: 
The official duties of the lead are described in the Bowls Australia September 2006 Laws of the Sport of Bowls Page 58 Section 8.37.4 and 37.5 and National Bowls Coaching Manual Page 36


Duty:
The lead of the team to play first in an end should;

  • Place the mat as described in Law 19.1.1., as per the game plan or as directed by the skip,
  • Deliver the jack and make sure that it is centred before
    delivering the first bowl of the end,
  • Help to return lawn bowls to a safe position behind the mat at the conclusion of each end.


Objective:
Leads are required to draw their bowls as close to the jack as possible. The operative words here are “as close to the jack as possible”.


Gamesmanship:
This is the art or practice of achieving the lead’s objective without engaging in a competitive game with the opposing lead. In other words ignore what the opposing lead is doing and achieve your objective.


Control:
Most experienced skips will acknowledge the importance of good leads, however good leads must not act independently but remember it is imperative that they understand the tactical reasons they are under the control of the skip throughout the game.


Game Plan: 
The progress of any lawn bowls game begins with a game plan. It is an overall strategy which in most cases is devised prior to the game or event.


Mat & Jack Tactics:
Tactics begin in trial ends; from the toss of the coin, the first placement position of the mat and playing length of the jack. It is therefore vital the lead watches the skip for instructions for the placement and delivery length. It is not the prerogative of the lead to move the mat around at will or vary the length of ends.


Trial ends:
During trial ends lawn bowls are played on the forehand and backhand to determine the best side to play. After consultation with the skip, the best side (usually the narrow hand) is chosen and played. This hand is not changed unless instructed by the skip.


Wisdom:
Wisdom suggests that the lead should always bowls on the same side of the rink as this obviates the necessity of having to cope with the varying width and pace of the green.


Forehand and Backhand: 
Do not play “around the clock”, meaning backhand or forehand both ways, the variation does not allow the greatest consistency and the team will be disadvantaged and head-building will be adversely effected.


Self Control: 
The requirement of leads is to deliver their bowls as close to the jack as possible. Unless specifically instructed by their skip; they should strictly avoid niggling at close opposition bowls, keep their mind clear and focused on their objective. Remember in a team effort, a good close second bowl is just as important as the shot bowl.


Disposition of the Head: 
The disposition of the leads bowls at the head play an important part in the building of the head. This involves both teams to consider the employment of the tactical skills of defence, attack and recovery. The following descriptions are a guide to what may occur when certain head formations take place;

  • Should the bowls come to rest 6 inches or 15 centimetres directly in front and rear of the jack (see Diagram 1). Its advantages are; it presents a very small target to the opposition and may force them to go into a minor attacking on-shot mode,
  • Should the bowls come to rest 6ins or 15cm obliquely right front and left rear of the jack (see Diagram 2), this presents a target on the left side of the head or when vice versa, on the other side,
  • Should the lawn bowls come to rest 6ins or 15cm right and left of the jack (see Diagram 3) it presents a target on both sides of the head for the opposition to draw or wrest your bowls out of the head,
  • Should the lead have one bowl close to the jack and one
    either to the rear or in front away from the jack (see Diagram 4) it gives poor support to your team building the head and allows the opposition an open chance to draw close bowls;

 

 

The Second

THE SECOND


 Official Duties: The second’s official duties are described in the Bowls Australia September 2006 Laws of the Sport of Bowls Page 57 Section 8. 37.3 and Page 58 Section 8. 37. 5

 General Duties: The second must be a versatile player for defence, attack or recovery with the ability to;

  • Draw on either hand to the jack or to a position designated by the skip,
  • Be able to play on-shots to trail the jack to designated lengths,
  • Rest on or wrest out bowls from the head.
  • When the lead has failed, re-establish the leads obligation at the head,
     
  • Maintain the score card and score board throughout the game;
  • Enter the names of all players of both teams on the score card
  • Record, on the score card all shots scored for and against the team as each end is completed
  • Check with the opposition at each end and ensure both cards and score board all agree,
  • Where applicable adjust the score board
  • Assist in moving the bowls back behind the mat at the conclusion of each end,
  • At the conclusion of the game the second should sign and countersign the cards and hand the team’s card to the manager.

Disposition of the Head: The disposition of the seconds bowls within the head play an important part in the building of the head which involve both teams to consider the employment of the tactical skills of defence, attack and recovery.


 Bowl Placement: Without giving any tactical solution to any particular problem, the diagrams below give examples of where bowls may be placed. This is indicated by the symbol “?”;


Diagram 5                                 Diagram 6
    ?          ?
          ?                                     ?        ?
          ?                                             ?
    ?   ?    ?                                  ?         ?
  Diagram 7                                 Diagram 8
   ?          ?                                 ?               ?
                                                            ?
     ?   ?   ?                                           ?
                                                       ?        ?
?                ?                                        ?
 

 

The Third

PLAYING YOUR PART AS THE TEAM THIRD
Presented by Macka Jensen
 

Harmony: It is essential the third works in complete harmony with the skip and members of the lawn bowls team. The third’s duties are described in Bowls Australia September 2006 Laws of the Sport of Bowls Page 57 Section 8. 37.2 and Page 58 Section 8. 37. 5.
 

  • Be in charge of the head when skips are bowling or in absent of the skip.
  • If delegated to measure for shot and decide with the opponent the number of shots and signal the result to skip and the second,
  • Help to return bowls to a safe position behind the mat at the conclusion of ach end,
  • Must know and be able to identify the teams and opponents bowls,
  • Answer the skips queries correctly and concisely.

Experience & Ability: Apart from being experienced in all shots from the draw to the drive, they must also be able to quickly indicate the position of the head or bowls when asked for this information.
 

Control & Advice: The thirds should not attempt to control the skips play, and refrain from offering advice unless pacifically asked for by the skip.
Idle Chatter: The third should not talk to the skip when crossing over unless spoken to as this will break the skips concentration.
Other Attributes:

 

  • Must be able to act as the director of the head,
  • Be able to determine the shot quickly when asked,
  • Able to indicate the up or down position after the skips bowls comes to rest,
  • Should always know who holds second and third shots,
  • Must always be aware of the position of bowls in the head when its his turn to play but under no circumstances pre-empt the skips instructions,
  • Must observe all shot measurements and where in doubt recheck the measurement,
  • It is vital that the third has a through knowledge of the laws of the game, conditions of play and the etiquette of the game.

Etiquette
The third should discourage any interruption by the lead or second when directing or measuring at the head.

 

The Skip

PLAYING YOUR PART AS THE TEAM SKIP
Presented by Macka Jensen

Responsibility
The skip carries the responsibilities and duties and therefore must be supported by the team. The skip official duties are described in the Bowls Australia September 2006 Laws of the Sport of Bowls Page 56 Section 8. 37.1

  • To be in charge of the team, delegate duties and notify opponent when necessary,
  • As applicable instruct the team members which shot to play,
  • Make decisions with the opponent to comply with the laws the game and conditions of play,
  • Ensure that the score card is returned to the appropriate authority.

Duties
To build a scoring head using the tactical fundamentals of defence, attack and recovery through the employment of the team member’s individual delivery skills to play any of the required shots of the game.

Ingenuity & Discipline
The skip is in charge of the team and must process the quality of being ingenious, be skilful of contrivance or design when building the head. Unfortunately this is an area that can lead to strong criticism by the team when the skipper is not working towards what they have been trained for or when the game plan is being ignored.

Strengths & Weaknesses
It is imperative when building the head for the skip to know his players strengths and weaknesses and the bias dimensions of their bowls. Many skips are prone to call for a shot or shots based on their own ability and the track of their bowls.

The Accruing Score
In Pennants the skip should be aware of the accruing score on the main scoring board, remembering that the team has a responsibility to the side and therefore should not adopt an over zealous attitude to the situation that will endanger the sides result.

Facial Expressions
The skip should endeavour not to display disappointment if a player performs a bad shot, but should always commend a player who plays a good shot. Try not to look worried in trying situations.

Qualities Expected
Be in control of the team and process the following;

Communication 
Have good communication with the team by;

  • Ensuring the team understands the game plan,
  • Carrying out debriefings and constructing the game plan,
  • Ascertaining appropriate hand signals with the team,
  • Being positive with instructions,
  • Keeping directions short, simple and indicate correctly.

Training
This is a lead up to your game plan and should involve;

  • Teams training together at least once a week on pacific performance tasks (not play a game together),
  • Consult your coach to improve strengths and weaknesses.

Tactics
Being ingenious contrive and instigate tactical know how by;

  • Ensuring that a team debriefing is conducted as soon as possible after each game and that each team member has the opportunity to express his point of view concerning; standard of the team play, the tactical situation and what needs to be improved and compare your actions with your previous game plan,
  • Constructing a game plan (if possible days before the game)
  • Knowing and being able to read the head,
  • Knowing the strengths and weaknesses of the team,
  • Ensuring you have control over mat placement and jack length,
  • Knowing and employing the tactics of the game,
  • Knowing when to play the opposition hand or shot,
  • Observing and where possible counter the tactical moves of the opposition.

Skills
Improving your own ability to enable you when required to play;

  • Any of the shots of the game e.g. draw shot, on-shots, running and drive shots.

Avoid
Detract yourself from being the main distraction to your team;

  • By yelling and bellowing like a bull at a gate,
  • Moving around at the head when a player is on the mat,
  • Casting shade over the head.

Rules
Understand and observe;

  • The Etiquette of the game,
  • The Laws of the Game,
  • The Conditions of Play.